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Here are some articles I’ve written for other publications. If you like what you see here, ask me about my freelance writing and editing services. Enjoy!

  • Zenefits: How to Write a Resignation Letter

    *This blog post is an excerpt from an article that I wrote for Zenefits. You can find the original here.

    When most people resign from a job, they’re often eager to move on to the next exciting step in their careers. Some might be tempted to hop from one place to the next without much attention to what lies between, or how to properly close the door on a current position in an amicable way. But there is a right way and a wrong way to resign. And the right way starts with a well-crafted resignation letter.

    Since the choices you make here could affect your career in the future, let’s look at the most common questions employees ask about writing a resignation letter.

    What is a resignation letter?

    A common misperception that some employees have is that the resignation letter is the first step in quitting a job. It’s not. (Or it shouldn’t be.) Before submitting your letter, sit down with your boss privately and let him or her know that you’re planning to leave and when.

    The resignation letter is a formal document that you submit to your boss and HR, officially resigning from your position.

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  • Inbody: How Does Muscle Affect Your Risk for Diabetes?

    *This blog post is an excerpt from an article that I wrote for InBody USA. You can find the original here.

     

    Muscle and Its Role in Diabetes Risk

    A widely-known but often misunderstood disease is steadily overtaking an increasing portion of the U.S. population. In this country, more than one-third of adults are at a high risk for developing this condition and causes about 330,000 deaths each year. This disease is diabetes.

    Diabetes, type 2 in particular, is a condition affecting an ever-expanding pool of Americans. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 30.3 million Americans had diabetes in 2015. That’s nearly 10 percent of the population! Furthermore, about 90 percent of those people had Type 2 Diabetes, and those numbers are only expected to rise.

    The steady increase in diabetes diagnoses is due, in part, to the obesity epidemic. 87.5 percent of adults with diabetes are overweight or obese according to their Body Mass Index (BMI), a simple health indicator based on the ratio of weight to height. However, these findings make it seem like only those with high body weight are at risk for diabetes, and that is not the case. In fact, so-called “skinny fat” people, individuals with a normal or low BMI but a high percent body fat, are at an increased risk to develop diabetes or prediabetes. As you can see, the underlying theme here is that, rather than a high body weight, it is an imbalanced body composition that increases the risk of diabetes. This is why it is important for those looking to reduce diabetes risk or manage their diabetes to understand their body composition.

    So what’s going on here? How does your body composition affect your diabetes risk, and can improve your body composition reduce that risk or help you overcome diabetes?

    Let’s first take a look at body composition. What is it and why is it important?

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  • Zenefits: Reflecting on Women in Small Business Month

    *This blog post is an excerpt from an article that I wrote for Zenefits. You can find the original here.

    Gender inequality and the gender pay gap are not only moral and social issues, but they also present an economic challenge. Women account for half the world’s population of working-age adults, but they are not currently achieving their full economic potential. If this trend continues, the global economy could suffer.

    In fact, according to a 2015 report by the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), advancing women’s economic parity can add $12 trillion in growth to the global economy by 2025. That’s an 11 percent increase. These results would come from what MGI calls a “best in region” scenario. That would mean every country in a particular region–say the Caribbean or Central America–would improve women’s economic parity with men to match the rate of the fastest improving country in their region.

    And that “best in region” approach wouldn’t even require women in small business to reach their “full potential,” according to MGI. To meet the “full potential” scenario, women would have to participate in the economy identically to men. If that were to happen, it would add up to $28 trillion to the global economy. That’s the size of the Chinese and US economies combined.

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  • Zenefits: Boost Your Productivity by Upgrading Your Work Snacks

    *This blog post is an excerpt from an article that I wrote for Zenefits. You can find the original here.

    Food is an awesome resource. It provides fuel for your day. It brings friends and family together. Many historians have argued that food, or the lack of it, has started and ended wars.

    But what you eat is just as important as how much you eat. You’ve probably known this for a long time. Your partner has been after you to eat more fruits and vegetables. You’ve heard that lean proteins and whole grains can reduce your risk of heart disease, obesity, and stroke, and a low sugar diet can lower your diabetes risk too. Scientists are even saying that our food choices can affect climate change and the environment.

    Now you have one more reason to eat healthy: it might boost productivity at work.

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  • Zenefits: 25% of Small Businesses Are Still Using Pen and Paper for Their Payroll

    *This blog post is an excerpt from an article that I wrote for Zenefits. You can find the original here.

    There is no more essential task for an employer than payroll. If you have people working for you, they’re going to expect a check at the end of the pay period. And if it doesn’t show, you probably won’t have employees for long.

    Payroll can also be one of the most intimidating employer tasks. There are numerous regulations to be aware of, forms to file, and deductions to take. For example, will you deduct health insurance premiums, flex spending, or retirement contributions? How do you withhold taxes, Medicare, and social security? How many hours does an employee have to work before overtime kicks in? And what the heck is a FICA?

    With all of these questions and the consequences that come from getting them wrong, it’s no surprise that so many small business owners find payroll to be daunting. But here’s what did surprise us: 25% of small businesses are still using pen and paper for their payroll records rather than investing in a reliable payroll software or accounting service.

    Why? Let’s take a closer look at payroll accounting and manual record keeping.

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  • Zenefits: How to Quiet Workplace Distractions and Increase Productivity

    *This blog post is an excerpt from an article that I wrote for Zenefits. You can find the original here.

    It seems that everywhere you look around the office, there is something to break your concentration. At work, there’s Slack, Jira, emails, and Confluence. Your friends and family text you all day. Your workflow is constantly interrupted by calls, push notifications, or conversations happening just outside your cubicle (or for those in open office floor plans– all around you). How are employees expected to get any uninterrupted work done with so many workplace distractions?

    Let’s take a look at some of the distractions workers face today, and how to encourage employees and coworkers to decrease them. We’ll also discuss some ideas to help increase focus and boost productivity.

    Common Workplace Distractions and How to Overcome Them

    • Smartphones: It is nearly impossible to resist the siren call of that phone in your pocket. If you get a text, Facebook notification, or phone call, it almost feels painful not to check it. Then once you respond, that leads to a back and forth that could suck away a lot of time. To avoid temptation, try putting your phone on “do not disturb.” You could even–gasp!–turn it off while you’re at work.
    • Emails: In many offices, employees have their email set up to notify them of each new message. When the notification pops up on your screen, you feel compelled to answer immediately. Try changing your settings so that push notifications are disabled. Then schedule a designated time of day to check your emails and respond to them.

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  • Zenefits: Want to Improve Workplace Communication?

    *This blog post is excerpted from an article I originally wrote for Zenefits. You can find the full article here.

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    When was the last time you opened your email inbox at work and found nothing but clear, useful messages? If you’re like most people, you probably can’t remember. Research shows that most people spend 13 hours of their workweek dealing with emails. But only 38% of the emails that end up in their inboxes are actually important and relevant to their jobs. This inefficient communication is a huge drain on productivity.

    Other avenues for communication in the workplace share similar stories. You know all those long, mandatory meetings you’re forced to sit through? According to a 2015 survey, 46 percent of employees say they rarely leave the meeting knowing exactly what to do next. And a Gallup poll revealed that 74% of employees say they are missing out on important company news.

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    If you have a website, but you’re not quite ready to invest in paid writing services, no problem! I have a FREE email list that will give you access to a ton of writing and content marketing advice. If you sign up, you’ll also get access to a ton of free templates and resources, like my blog content calendar template, email marketing template, copy-and-paste writing samples, and more! Sign up here and I’ll email all of that to you for free!

     

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  • Crixeo: Why Do Institutions Cover up Child Abuse?

    *This blog post is excerpted from an article that I originally wrote for Crixeo Magazine. You can find the full text here.

    Witnesses Often Fail to Report Child Abuse. But Why? The Answer May Lie in Psychology

    In January of 2018, Dr. Larry Nassar, disgraced team physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for decades of abuse of gymnasts under his care. Nassar assaulted 265 girls, the youngest of whom was only six years old at the time of the abuse.

    People around the world reacted with horror when the investigations into Nassar’s crimes revealed that many adults knew about the abuse and did nothing to stop it. Rather than helping the victims, these witnesses pressured them to stay silent, or tried to convince them that the abuse hadn’t happened.

    Twenty-one years ago, at the age of 16, Larissa Boyce thought she was living her dream. She was a young gymnast training at MSU with one of her idols, gymnastics legend Kathie Klages. When Nassar assaulted Boyce during a medical exam, she went straight to Klages, who was the MSU head coach at the time.

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    “She was the person I looked up to. She was the person I thought had my back,” Boyce read from her victim impact statement during Nassar’s sentencing hearing. But instead of helping, Klages told Boyce she couldn’t imagine Nassar “doing anything questionable.” She told Boyce she had misunderstood a normal medical exam and advised her not to file a report.

    Many other coaches and administrators at MSU and USA Gymnastics also received reports of Nassar’s abuse. Most either failed to report, or delayed their report by weeks.

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  • Grok Nation: I Put My Toddler on a Screen Detox

    *This blog post is excerpted from an article I originally wrote for Grok Nation. You can find the full text here.

    I gave my toddler my iPhone—and invented the “Screen Detox”

    Read how I learned the hard way how to limit my son’s screen time.

    I homeschool three “big” kids with two dogs and a toddler at home, so I’m one busy mama. The dogs are easy. Just a pat on the head and a trip to the back  yard and they’re good for hours. But my 3-year-old son, Gianni–let’s just say he doesn’t like being on the sidelines.

    I’d never been a mom who allowed much screen time. Gianni’s older siblings got to watch one movie a week at his age. But with my fourth kid, that rule was difficult to enforce.

    Just like any addiction, Gianni’s iPhone habit started with a small fix. The big kids and I were sitting at the table working on math. My plan was to set up the older two girls with their school work, answer a few questions, then sit down with my first grade son to walk him through his problems.

    But Gianni didn’t get that this situation called for quiet. (What toddler does, right?)

    He asked me for milk. He spilled the milk. I went to clean it up.

    My daughter asked me a question. I shouted something about numerators and denominators into the dining room as I mopped the kitchen floor.

    Gianni wanted more milk. I poured it for him. His big brother asked what was taking me so long.

    I went back to the dining room. Gianni followed me.

    You get the idea. It was never ending.

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    Did you know that I’m a freelance writer for hire? If you need help with content marketing, blog writing, or email marketing, I’m your girl! Email me today!

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  • Crixeo: A Brief History of the Circumcision Debate

    *This blog post is an excerpt of an article I wrote for Crixeo.

    On his eighth day of life, a newborn Jewish boy is taken to his family’s synagogue. His mother hands him to the kvatters, who place him in the Chair of Elijah for his bris. So begins the Jewish ritual of circumcision, which tradition says seals Abraham’s covenant with God as described in Genesis 17.

    A Muslim family teaches their sons that the Prophet Muhammad was born without a foreskin. To emulate the prophet, Muslim boys are circumcised, usually in a hospital, sometime before the age of 12.

    People of many cultures and religions, including Jews, Muslims, ancient Egyptians and tribal people around the world, have practiced male circumcision for centuries. No one knows for sure exactly when it started, but some historians say it may have begun as a puberty rite among Australian aboriginal tribes in 10,000 BC. Later, tribes in Northern East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula would adopt the practice.

    Circumcision has fallen in and out of favor throughout history, but the story of its introduction to nonreligious, Western populations is interesting. Outside of Jewish and Muslim communities, it was uncommon to routinely circumcise boys until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when doctors began promoting it as a way to prevent masturbation and some diseases.

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