Zenefits: Want to Improve Workplace Communication?

*This blog post is excerpted from an article I originally wrote for Zenefits. You can find the full article here. When was the last time you opened your email inbox at work and found nothing but clear, useful messages? If you’re like most people, you probably can’t remember. Research shows that most people spend 13 hours of their workweek dealing with emails. But only 38% of the emails that end up in their inboxes are actually important and relevant to their jobs. This inefficient communication is a huge drain on productivity. Other avenues for communication in the workplace share similar stories. You know all those long, mandatory meetings you’re forced to sit through? According to a 2015 survey, 46 percent of employees say they rarely leave the meeting knowing exactly what to do next. And a Gallup poll revealed that 74% of employees say they are missing out on important company news.

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Crixeo: Why Do Institutions Cover up Child Abuse?

*This blog post is excerpted from an article that I originally wrote for Crixeo Magazine. You can find the full text here. Witnesses Often Fail to Report Child Abuse. But Why? The Answer May Lie in Psychology In January of 2018, Dr. Larry Nassar, disgraced team physician for USA Gymnastics and Michigan State University, was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in prison for decades of abuse of gymnasts under his care. Nassar assaulted 265 girls, the youngest of whom was only six years old at the time of the abuse.

Grok Nation: I Put My Toddler on a Screen Detox

*This blog post is excerpted from an article I originally wrote for Grok Nation. I homeschool three “big” kids with two dogs and a toddler at home, so I’m one busy mama. The dogs are easy. Just a pat on the head and a trip to the back  yard and they're good for hours. But my 3-year-old son, Gianni–let’s just say he doesn’t like being on the sidelines. I’d never been a mom who allowed much screen time. Gianni’s older siblings got to watch one movie a week at his age. But with my fourth kid, that rule was difficult to enforce.

Crixeo: A Brief History of the Circumcision Debate

On his eighth day of life, a newborn Jewish boy is taken to his family’s synagogue. His mother hands him to the kvatters, who place him in the Chair of Elijah for his bris. So begins the Jewish ritual of circumcision, which tradition says seals Abraham’s covenant with God as described in Genesis 17. A Muslim family teaches their sons that the Prophet Muhammad was born without a foreskin. To emulate the prophet, Muslim boys are circumcised, usually in a hospital, sometime before the age of 12. People of many cultures and religions, including Jews, Muslims, ancient Egyptians and tribal people around the world, have practiced male circumcision for centuries. No one knows for sure exactly when it started, but some historians say it may have begun as a puberty rite among Australian aboriginal tribes in 10,000 BC. Later, tribes in Northern East Africa and the Arabian Peninsula would adopt the practice. Circumcision has fallen in and out of favor throughout history, but the story of its introduction to nonreligious, Western populations is interesting. Outside of Jewish and Muslim communities, it was uncommon to routinely circumcise boys until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, when doctors began promoting it as a way to prevent masturbation and some diseases.

Missing Children’s Awareness Day

Almost exactly four years ago, on a sunny June day in a beautiful Atlantic beach town, I thought my life was ending. My son, Raymond, who was just a few weeks from his third birthday, disappeared on a crowded boardwalk. We’d just gotten off the Jolly Trolley at the boardwalk — Raymond, his two older sisters, my husband and I. For less than a minute, my husband and I took our eyes off the kids while we discussed where we wanted to eat dinner. Less than a minute. How many times have you taken your eyes off your child in a public place for a few seconds? You dig through your purse at the grocery store. You text your spouse. You crane your neck, searching for the other mom you were supposed to meet for lunch.

Today’s Parent: Are Academic Demands and Over-scheduling Stressing Kids Out?

*This post is excerpted from an article I wrote for todaysparent.com. From standardized tests and heavy homework loads to after-school sports and tutors, elementary-aged children are taking on more responsibilities than ever before. Despite the popular notion that kids today are coddled, many experts believe they are actually under more stress than previous generations. Read … Continue reading Today’s Parent: Are Academic Demands and Over-scheduling Stressing Kids Out?

Crixeo: Should Science Edit out Genetic Disorders?

*This post is excerpted from an article that I wrote for Crixeo.  Scientists have successfully modified the DNA of a human embryo to erase a genetic and lethal heart condition. The experiment, published August 2 in the journal Nature, used a tool known as CRISPR, or Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats, and was the first to successfully “correct” a gene mutation in human embryos. Reactions to this news range from excitement to horror. Soon we could have the technology to help parents who carry genes for genetic disorders to conceive children free of those traits. But should we?

Today’s Parent: Can Contact Sports Like Hockey Really Cause Brain Disease in Kids?

*This post is excerpted from an article I wrote for Today's Parent. Ask a mom what she thinks about her kid playing contact sports like hockey or football and you’re likely to see some worry on her face, because of the risk of concussion. Perhaps you’ve read the recent media reports of scientific studies linking contact sports to a brain disease called CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy. One such study published in January 2018 in the journal Brain found evidence of CTE in the brains of deceased athletes. Some media reports say that these results are evidence that repeated hits to the head can cause CTE, even in players who have never suffered a concussion.

Zywave: What Do Clients Look for in a Broker?

*This post is excerpted from an article I wrote for a copywriting client, as part of my freelance writing services.  Zywave partners who serve businesses may have noticed that the insurance landscape has changed over the past several years. Whether you sell benefits packages or commercial lines, your clients expect more from you. No longer are brokers simple salespeople, finding their clients a good price on insurance products. Sure, you still have your basic, core responsibilities. You help your clients manage costs. You assist with compliance. But these services won’t set your agency apart.

Zywave: Using the Consultative Sales Approach

*This post is excerpted from an article I wrote for a copywriting client, as part of my freelance writing services.  Zywave partners know that a good broker-client relationship is essential to establishing trust. The consultative sales approach can help you build that client-broker relationship right from the start. You can use that rapport to propel your business to bigger and better sales. Our partners successfully use this approach as part of their for P&C insurance marketing strategy.

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